How to prevent oral aerosols transmission in dental practice

May 15, 2020, oyodentaluk

How to prevent oral aerosols transmission in dental practice
How to prevent oral aerosols transmission in dental practice
Oral aerosol suction unit designed for hospital dental clinic, a extraoral dental suction device configuration used aerosol precision higher HEAP filter and sterilization system, and can quickly filter the patients in the clinic process of droplet, aerosol, bacteria.

How to prevent oral aerosols transmission in dental practice

Aerosols are differentiated based on particle size: spatter (> 50 µm), droplet (≤ 50 µm), and droplet nuclei (≤ 10 µm).9,14,18,31 In dental settings, 90% of the aerosols produced are extremely small (< 5 µm).18 Spatter, being the larger particle, will fall until it contacts other objects (e.g., floor, countertop, sink, bracket, table, computer, patient or operator).9,19 Droplets remain suspended in the air until they evaporate, leaving droplet nuclei that contain bacteria related to respiratory infections.9,14 Droplet nuclei can contaminate surfaces in a range of three feet and may remain airborne for 30 minutes to two hours.9,10,13,17,18,30 If inhaled, the droplet nuclei can penetrate deep into the respiratory system.9,14,17–19,31 Furthermore, the susceptibility of developing an infection is influenced by virulence, dose and pathogenicity of the microorganisms, along with the host’s immune response.


PREVENTION AND REDUCTION
Recommended transmission-based precautions should be incorporated into daily practice to minimize aerosol production and prevent disease transmission from emitted particles. The risks of dental aerosols can be reduced with the use of high-velocity air evacuation and preprocedural antimicrobial mouthrinses, as well as by flushing waterlines at the beginning of the workday and between each patient, wearing personal protective equipment (PPE), and using air purifications systems.


AIR AND WATERLINE PRECAUTIONS
Water in the dental treatment setting should meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards for drinking water (< 500 colony forming units/ml of heterotrophic water bacteria).13,35 To ensure the delivery of safe water, manufacturer instructions for use (IFU) should be followed for the dental unit and any waterline treatment products.


PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Standard precautions, as outlined by the CDC, involve the use of PPE.13,35 Primary PPE includes donning properly fitting gloves and surgical masks, protective eyewear with solid side shields or face shield, and protective clothing/disposable gowns.


VENTILATION MANAGEMENT
Aerosol control in confined, poorly ventilated spaces where the air exchange with filtration cannot be successfully applied presents a challenge.15 Another hurdle is to decrease the indoor concentration of bioaerosols.15 While some indoor air purification techniques aim solely at reducing aerosol concentrations, others are designed to inactivate viable bioaerosols.15 Strong evidence demonstrates ventilation in a practice setting can impact the spread of airborne infections

CONCLUSION
Due to the risk of infectious transmission posed by dental aerosols, transmission-based precautions should be a key element of daily practice. Patients and practitioners are regularly exposed to tens of thousands of aerosols generated during procedures,30 and this exposure increases the potential for respiratory infections.Oral aerosol suction unit designed for hospital dental clinic, a extraoral dental suction device configuration used aerosol precision higher HEAP filter and sterilization system, and can quickly filter the patients in the clinic process of droplet, aerosol, bacteria.

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